does smoking increases pregnancy risk while taking yasminlle?

I am 19 and i dont smoke every day i only smoke while drinking etc. does smoking increases the risk of me getting pregnant?

Patrycja asked on 23 May '11 at 15:41


Answers of Similar Question


Rhianna does medicine year 1 answer on 09 May '11 at 17:44

Yes and no. The hormones that are increased in pregnancy and contained in the contraceptive Pill aren't the only risk factors for blot clots forming during pregnancy. What the Pill and pregnancy both have in common is that they both produce hormones that increase the bloods clotting ability. Oestrogen increases the risk of DVTs by increasing the production of certain chemicals necessary for the blood to clot. It also increases platelet numbers + stickiness of platelets, which increases clot formation (to prepare for blood loss during child birth). Progestogen in the Pill causes the blood vessels to relax and widen, allowing the blood to pool in the veins, increasing risk of clot formation. Blood clots in pregnancy are generally the result of increased venous stasis- blood pooling in the lower deep veins. As I said above, balance of proteins of the coagulation + fibrinolytic systems also play a part. DVT can of course lead to a pulmonary embolism. Clots in pregnancy and from the Pill are generally always the results of clots that have formed in the deep veins of the legs, broken away and then embolised in the lungs. Women who do have clots in pregnancy and whilst taking the contraceptive Pill, generally also have certain other risk factors such as protein C and S deficiency and most commonly Factor V Leiden mutation. Over all health of the woman also plays a part- obesity, poor diet/unhealthy lifestyle and a smoking history also increases the risk as does age. During pregnancy the uterus also expands, putting pressure on the lower blood vessels which can restrict blood flow from the legs and pelvis back to the heart. Physiological structural changes during pregnancy are risk factors alone.

Rachel answer on 09 May '11 at 20:22

When you are pregnant, there is a hormone that is present in your body. The tests obviously check for that hormone to be present. In some cases, the hormone can be so low that it doesn't register. This is typical of testing too early, as this hormone multiplies or grows stronger the farther along you are. This is the same hormone that doctors check throughout the pregnancy to determine if one may be at risk for a miscarriage. If the count isn't high enough when you are so far along, there can be trouble. I've never heard of caffeine doing that, although besides testing too early, an error with the test or misread are normally the culprits.

Rupac answer on 09 May '11 at 20:51

When you are pregnant, there is a hormone that is present in your body. The tests obviously check for that hormone to be present. In some cases, the hormone can be so low that it doesn't register. This is typical of testing too early, as this hormone multiplies or grows stronger the farther along you are. This is the same hormone that doctors check throughout the pregnancy to determine if one may be at risk for a miscarriage. If the count isn't high enough when you are so far along, there can be trouble. I've never heard of caffeine doing that, although besides testing too early, an error with the test or misread are normally the culprits.

Rupac answer on 09 May '11 at 21:06

When you are pregnant, there is a hormone that is present in your body. The tests obviously check for that hormone to be present. In some cases, the hormone can be so low that it doesn't register. This is typical of testing too early, as this hormone multiplies or grows stronger the farther along you are. This is the same hormone that doctors check throughout the pregnancy to determine if one may be at risk for a miscarriage. If the count isn't high enough when you are so far along, there can be trouble. I've never heard of caffeine doing that, although besides testing too early, an error with the test or misread are normally the culprits.

Lady_dawn2 answer on 09 May '11 at 21:06

There are no more risks based upon interracial children. My suggestions? If you are on the pill you should go off it now and use other forms of birthcontrol until you are ready to conceive. Go ahead and start taking prenatal vitamins and a folic acid supplment. If you don't eat healthy START. You should also get plenty of exercise, walking is great especially when you are pregnant so start now if you don't already. If you smoke, stop now. If your husband smokes ask him to quit. Make your home a no smoking zone to everyone who comes over. Nothing wrong with having a drink now and again, but limited and once you are pregnant NEVER! Once the child arrives, if you can breastfeed him/her, you will never regret it! Now, stop stressing about it. A great source for child development is Dr. Sears. I'd recommend purchasing his books. Also, take your concerns to your OB/GYN and start shopping for a good pediatrician.