Is it safe to drink one root beer soda a day during pregnancy?

I have cut out caffeine since I found out I was pregnant--I have been drinking water and lemonade daily but I want some strong to drink-is it safe to drink atleast one root beer soda during pregnancy? If not, any suggestions?

I love my wife! asked on 10 May '11 at 11:27

1 Answers


Bumblebee answer on 10 May '11 at 11:27

no dont take it, you don't want your baby to become addicted to that crap besides i know you wouldn't want to gain alot of weight

Answers of Similar Question


Mama to 1- #2 it's a boy!!! answer on 10 May '11 at 03:53

Congrats and GREAT for you to start preparing your body AHEAD of time!! :) Start making sure you are getting plenty from all food groups, take a prenatal with plenty of folic acid! After you get pregnant spend a little more and add a DHA supplement. If you don't like/ can't drink milk, be sure to add a calcium supplement as well, drink PLENTY of water! TRY to cut out or cut back all caffeine and sodas. Start tracking your cycles. If you aren't wanting to take your temp (I don't, personally, there is no way I could take it at the same time every day before I wake up!), a good site to use is www.mymonthlycycles.com you can input your cycles and it will tell you when you are at your most fertile. If you don't have a regular cycle, then I would recommend using an OPK starting your first month, they cost a bit, but take the guess work out of knowing when you ovulate. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can monitor your cervix for ovulation. You can look that up on google, there are plenty of great sites that will instruct you on how to safely do so. That's the physical stuff, as far as mentally, just relax and have fun! Know that it probably will not happen on the first try! Just enjoy this time with your hubby! Good luck to you! I wish you a happy and very healthy nine months!!

Mama to 1- #2 it's a boy!!! answer on 10 May '11 at 04:07

Congrats and GREAT for you to start preparing your body AHEAD of time!! :) Start making sure you are getting plenty from all food groups, take a prenatal with plenty of folic acid! After you get pregnant spend a little more and add a DHA supplement. If you don't like/ can't drink milk, be sure to add a calcium supplement as well, drink PLENTY of water! TRY to cut out or cut back all caffeine and sodas. Start tracking your cycles. If you aren't wanting to take your temp (I don't, personally, there is no way I could take it at the same time every day before I wake up!), a good site to use is www.mymonthlycycles.com you can input your cycles and it will tell you when you are at your most fertile. If you don't have a regular cycle, then I would recommend using an OPK starting your first month, they cost a bit, but take the guess work out of knowing when you ovulate. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can monitor your cervix for ovulation. You can look that up on google, there are plenty of great sites that will instruct you on how to safely do so. That's the physical stuff, as far as mentally, just relax and have fun! Know that it probably will not happen on the first try! Just enjoy this time with your hubby! Good luck to you! I wish you a happy and very healthy nine months!!

????s??? ????? answer on 10 May '11 at 04:07

I traveled internationally (14+ hours each way) this past summer while pregnant. I left when I was 13 weeks and returned when I was around 30 weeks. I also did another short (3 hours each way) international trip (left at 32 weeks and returned at 34 weeks). My daughter was born 23 December and is perfectly healthy and happy. I have also traveled internationally at various stages with my first two pregnancies (my children are now 8&6). You are safe to travel by plane from the beginning of your pregnancy all the way up until the end portion of your last trimester (usually 9th month - 36 weeks) and can manage what ever kind of trip(s) you want to do as long as you and your pregnancy are healthy and the pregnancy is progressing normally. As long as everything is fine, air travel does NOT increase the risk of miscarriage or pre-term labor, and poses no other risks to you or your child. The radiation risks are so low that they won't do any harm to you or your child. It is the last four weeks (once you reach the 9th month - 36 weeks) that women are usually prohibited from flying. This is because after 36 weeks, a women can go into labor at any time, and the airplane is not made to handle such situations. For one, there is no guarantee that a doctor will be on board a plane, plus, should any complications arise during the labor and delivery, the plane does not have the medical equipment to handle such situations and it could put the health of the mother and child in danger. You need to get a check-up from your doctor to make sure that you are in fit enough health, and that the pregnancy is healthy enough to allow for you to fly. Many airlines will require a medical certificate from your doctor dated 24-72 hours before your flight once you reach your third trimester (27 weeks). By the time you reach your eighth month (32 weeks) almost all airlines will require a doctors note. All airlines make up their own rules and regulations regarding pregnant women. Some do not restrict travel at all, no matter what stage of pregnancy a women is in, and others start to restrict at 7 months, although the majority restrict around 36 weeks. FAA Airline regulations state : Obstetrical patients are free to fly, but pose a significant risk in later stages of precipitating delivery during flight. Pregnancy past 32 weeks should be carefully considered for restriction from flight and must be accompanied with an authorization note from a doctor. Those past 36 weeks should be prohibited from flying unless personally accompanied by their doctor. (Taken from my husbands flight security and survival manual & FAA site) --- While traveling I advise you to keep your medical records, and the name and number of your doctor. You should also get the name and number of a doctor where you will be staying/visiting in case an emergency comes up. To keep yourself safe and comfortable on the trip, follow these simple things: *drink plenty of water *avoid caffeine *don't eat food that causes gas for at least one day before you travel (pressure builds up as you ascend through the altitudes and could cause pain) *walk around as much as you can (up and down the aisles) *stretch while sitting *wear loose fitting clothing *wear slip on shoes (your feet may swell) *wear maternity support pantyhose or socks *try to get an aisle seat or a front row seat for more leg room *eat light foods *eat small meals or snacks at frequent intervals rather than big heavy meals *do not eat salt *Wear your seat belt just under your abdomen (depending on how big you are, you can also ask for a seat belt extender - just be sure that that too goes under your abdomen) *relax I wrote an article about traveling while pregnant. It gives more in-depth information if you'd like to reference it: --- If I can be of any more help or assistance, please feel free to contact me.

Krish g answer on 30 May '12 at 01:22

Fish is a great and healthy food to have while pregnant! Its a simple matter of what TYPE of fish to avoid like the large salt water fish that contain high levels of mercury. Fresh water fish like trout, catfish, fish sticks, flounder, salmon, craoker, and haddok are ok to eat. Tuna can be eaten in moderation (one serving a week). Large fish like shark, tile fish, swordfish, tuna steaks, sea bass, Halibut and other LARGE saltwater fish are known to contain high levels of methyl mercury, a substance that can potentially cause neurological damage when consumed in large amounts. Farm-raised trout and catfish, Pacific salmon, and fish sticks are safe. Shellfish (shrimp, crawfish, crab, etc)are also fine to eat while pregnant. Remember that all of these are to be well cooked, not raw or smoked. Other foods to avoid are- -Raw meats -Raw chicken -Raw eggs (Caesar salads and eggnog!!!) -Soft cheeses, including Brie, Camembert, Mexican-style, and any other cheese that may be made with inadequately pasteurized milk, can harbor Listeria. -Do not drink raw milk, or eat foods that contain unpasteurized milk. -Pate -Unwashed fruits & vegetables -Foods & drinks that contain caffeine (limit or avoid!) tea, coffee, and colas -Alcohol -Saccharin (NutraSweet is preferable) Liver should be avoided whilst pregnant (including all pate) as is contains a high level of Vitamin A which can be very harmful to your unborn baby. Anemia is common during pregnancy so you could look for other ways of increasing your vitamin A levels - remember to take your folic acid supplement!. Peanuts are also a healthy snack and should only be avoided if you are allergic to them. Eat more often but smaller amounts. Try not to go more than four hours between eating. Get out of bed slowly Keep biscuits handy to eat before getting out of bed Avoid large meals Rest as much as you can as feeling tiredness makes the feeling worse Try to avoid smells and food that make you feel worse Clean, lemony smells may make you feel better Avoid eating spicy or fatty foods Try to wear loose clothes that don't put pressure on your stomach Tips to prevent heartburn

Krish g answer on 10 Sep '12 at 01:22

New mothers must take special care of their bodies after giving birth and while breastfeeding. This page is dedicated for mothers, please go through important information and tips given to take care of yourself. Take Rest The first few days at home after having your baby are a time for rest and recuperation, physically and emotionally. You need to focus your energy on yourself and on getting to know your new baby. Even though you may be very excited and have requests for lots of visits from family and friends, try to get as much rest as possible. Try to lie down or nap while the baby naps. Don't try to do too much around the house. Allow others to help you and don't be afraid to ask for help with cleaning, laundry, meals, or with caring for the baby. Changes in your Body: After the birth of your baby your doctor will talk with you about things you will experience as your body starts to recover. Possible Changes in your Body: Spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period off and on for up to six weeks. May have swelling in your legs and feet. Reduce swelling by keeping your feet elevated when possible. Constipation. Drink plenty of water and eat fresh fruits and vegetables. Menstrual like cramping is common, especially if you are breastfeeding. Your breast milk will come in within three to six days after your delivery. Even if you are not breastfeeding. Recommendation: Abstain from loveual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth. Before resuming loveual intercourse, talk with your doctor about your plan for birth control since you can become pregnant again. Changes in Weight and Shape of Your Body: Both pregnancy and labor can affect a woman's body. If you are trying to lose some additional pregnancy weight, make sure you do it in a healthy way and consult your doctor before you start any type of diet or exercise plan. If you want to diet and are breastfeeding, it is best to wait until your baby is at least two months old. Do not lose too much weight quickly. This can be harmful to the baby because environmental toxins that are stored in your body fat can be released into your breast milk. Losing about one pound per week has been safe and will not affect your milk supply or the baby's growth. Feeling Sad and Depressed: You may feel sad or depressed. This is normal following childbirth. Fifty to 75 percent of new mothers feel a little sad or depressed after giving birth. Your hormone changes, anxiety about caring for the baby, and lack of sleep all affect your emotions. Be patient with yourself. These feelings are normal and should get better over time. Be aware of your feelings and talk with your family, friends, and your doctor. If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, Consult Doctor. It may be a serious condition called postpartum depression. This condition can be successfully treated with medicine and/or therapy. Symptoms of postpartum depression : Restless or irritable Sad, depressed or crying a lot Difficulty in focusing, remembering, or making decisions Feeling worthless and guilty Having no interest or getting no pleasure from activities like love and socializing No energy Headaches, chest pains, numbness, or hyperventilation Sleepless, being very tired, or both Overeating and weight gain