Pregnancy safe ways to calm anxiety on an airplane?

I have a horrible fear of flying. Usually, everytime I fly I take some Xanax to calm my nerves. That is really the only way I can fly without having an increased heart rate, sweaty palms, shaking, etc. I have to fly for Thanksgiving. I wil be 13 1/2 weeks when I fly. Does anyone know of any ways I can calm my anxiety while flying that is safe for pregnancy? I know it's not healthy to be that nervous while I am pregnant and really want to do something to ease my anxiety. Thanks.

Sarah asked on 10 May '11 at 01:08

1 Answers


Mama d...to be! answer on 10 May '11 at 01:08

I always suggest doing some deep breathing. It will help offset the fear/panic response that happens in the brain. Four deep breaths that fill your belly will short circuit the limbic system in your brain and make the experience of panic minimal. It may also help you to make a playlist for your ipod, bring some magazines or a book you've been wanting to read. Bring along things to take your mind off of your fear. You could try wearing a rubber band on your wrist and snapping it when you notice yourself starting to worry. Keep telling yourself "I am perfectly safe. Panic is not an option. I must stay calm for this baby". I hope you have a great flight and a happy Thanksgiving!

Answers of Similar Question


Mama to 1- #2 it's a boy!!! answer on 10 May '11 at 03:53

Congrats and GREAT for you to start preparing your body AHEAD of time!! :) Start making sure you are getting plenty from all food groups, take a prenatal with plenty of folic acid! After you get pregnant spend a little more and add a DHA supplement. If you don't like/ can't drink milk, be sure to add a calcium supplement as well, drink PLENTY of water! TRY to cut out or cut back all caffeine and sodas. Start tracking your cycles. If you aren't wanting to take your temp (I don't, personally, there is no way I could take it at the same time every day before I wake up!), a good site to use is www.mymonthlycycles.com you can input your cycles and it will tell you when you are at your most fertile. If you don't have a regular cycle, then I would recommend using an OPK starting your first month, they cost a bit, but take the guess work out of knowing when you ovulate. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can monitor your cervix for ovulation. You can look that up on google, there are plenty of great sites that will instruct you on how to safely do so. That's the physical stuff, as far as mentally, just relax and have fun! Know that it probably will not happen on the first try! Just enjoy this time with your hubby! Good luck to you! I wish you a happy and very healthy nine months!!

Mama to 1- #2 it's a boy!!! answer on 10 May '11 at 04:07

Congrats and GREAT for you to start preparing your body AHEAD of time!! :) Start making sure you are getting plenty from all food groups, take a prenatal with plenty of folic acid! After you get pregnant spend a little more and add a DHA supplement. If you don't like/ can't drink milk, be sure to add a calcium supplement as well, drink PLENTY of water! TRY to cut out or cut back all caffeine and sodas. Start tracking your cycles. If you aren't wanting to take your temp (I don't, personally, there is no way I could take it at the same time every day before I wake up!), a good site to use is www.mymonthlycycles.com you can input your cycles and it will tell you when you are at your most fertile. If you don't have a regular cycle, then I would recommend using an OPK starting your first month, they cost a bit, but take the guess work out of knowing when you ovulate. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can monitor your cervix for ovulation. You can look that up on google, there are plenty of great sites that will instruct you on how to safely do so. That's the physical stuff, as far as mentally, just relax and have fun! Know that it probably will not happen on the first try! Just enjoy this time with your hubby! Good luck to you! I wish you a happy and very healthy nine months!!

????s??? ????? answer on 10 May '11 at 04:07

I traveled internationally (14+ hours each way) this past summer while pregnant. I left when I was 13 weeks and returned when I was around 30 weeks. I also did another short (3 hours each way) international trip (left at 32 weeks and returned at 34 weeks). My daughter was born 23 December and is perfectly healthy and happy. I have also traveled internationally at various stages with my first two pregnancies (my children are now 8&6). You are safe to travel by plane from the beginning of your pregnancy all the way up until the end portion of your last trimester (usually 9th month - 36 weeks) and can manage what ever kind of trip(s) you want to do as long as you and your pregnancy are healthy and the pregnancy is progressing normally. As long as everything is fine, air travel does NOT increase the risk of miscarriage or pre-term labor, and poses no other risks to you or your child. The radiation risks are so low that they won't do any harm to you or your child. It is the last four weeks (once you reach the 9th month - 36 weeks) that women are usually prohibited from flying. This is because after 36 weeks, a women can go into labor at any time, and the airplane is not made to handle such situations. For one, there is no guarantee that a doctor will be on board a plane, plus, should any complications arise during the labor and delivery, the plane does not have the medical equipment to handle such situations and it could put the health of the mother and child in danger. You need to get a check-up from your doctor to make sure that you are in fit enough health, and that the pregnancy is healthy enough to allow for you to fly. Many airlines will require a medical certificate from your doctor dated 24-72 hours before your flight once you reach your third trimester (27 weeks). By the time you reach your eighth month (32 weeks) almost all airlines will require a doctors note. All airlines make up their own rules and regulations regarding pregnant women. Some do not restrict travel at all, no matter what stage of pregnancy a women is in, and others start to restrict at 7 months, although the majority restrict around 36 weeks. FAA Airline regulations state : Obstetrical patients are free to fly, but pose a significant risk in later stages of precipitating delivery during flight. Pregnancy past 32 weeks should be carefully considered for restriction from flight and must be accompanied with an authorization note from a doctor. Those past 36 weeks should be prohibited from flying unless personally accompanied by their doctor. (Taken from my husbands flight security and survival manual & FAA site) --- While traveling I advise you to keep your medical records, and the name and number of your doctor. You should also get the name and number of a doctor where you will be staying/visiting in case an emergency comes up. To keep yourself safe and comfortable on the trip, follow these simple things: *drink plenty of water *avoid caffeine *don't eat food that causes gas for at least one day before you travel (pressure builds up as you ascend through the altitudes and could cause pain) *walk around as much as you can (up and down the aisles) *stretch while sitting *wear loose fitting clothing *wear slip on shoes (your feet may swell) *wear maternity support pantyhose or socks *try to get an aisle seat or a front row seat for more leg room *eat light foods *eat small meals or snacks at frequent intervals rather than big heavy meals *do not eat salt *Wear your seat belt just under your abdomen (depending on how big you are, you can also ask for a seat belt extender - just be sure that that too goes under your abdomen) *relax I wrote an article about traveling while pregnant. It gives more in-depth information if you'd like to reference it: --- If I can be of any more help or assistance, please feel free to contact me.

Lena answer on 10 May '11 at 10:03

wow, sounds like a pregnancy could be very risky, if not impossible. First you should ask your doctor about what (if any) meds you should be taking and if there are ones for your conditions safe during pregnancy. Visit an ob/gyn to get a check up also. You will be condsidered high risk so if/when you get pregnant be sure to use an ob/gyn and not a midwife or family practice doctor. You should start taking a prenatal vitamin also. If your underweight or overwieght try to get to an ideal weight, the better you can make your health, the better your chances of healthy conception and a healthy pregnancy. I highly recommend the book "What to expect when your expecting" Theres a good section for older mothers and good advice on pregnancy with certain conditions. Good Luck!!!

Krish answer on 16 Jul '11 at 15:47

Morning sickness is a symptom some women feel during early pregnancy. It starts after conception which may or may not occur after unprotected intercourse. So, first confirm that you are pregnant by using a home pregnancy test, and if positive, make an appointment for a health care professional to confirm those results and to start prenatal care. 

Once you have a confirmed pregnancy, the morning sickness usually starts around the first 4 to 6 weeks of pregnancy and it tends to get worse over the next month or so after it begins. However, for some women, the queasiness begins as early as two weeks after conception. 

Morning sickness for the majority of women stops around the 12 th week, but for many women it continues until the 14th to 16th week. About half of the women feel complete relief by 14 weeks. For the rest, it may take one more month or so for it to stop. It can return later, and for some unlucky women it can come and go throughout the entire pregnancy. There isn't a set time for it to stop because each woman is different, and each pregnancy is different. 

If nausea and vomiting persists well into the second trimester (after the 13th week) you should contact your doctor just to be on the safe side. It isn't harmful to you or your baby unless you have excessive vomiting and can't keep anything down. If you are unable to eat or drink fluids and keep it down for 24 hours straight, you may have something called hyperemesis gravidarum. This condition can be harmful to both you and your baby, so you should contact your doctor right away to see if you need any special treatment.