How is it possible in ectopic pregnancy for sperm to contact an egg that doesn't enter the uterine tube?

How is it possible in ectopic pregnancy (on abdominal wall) for sperm to contact an egg which does not enter the uterine tube?

Catmoosebear asked on 09 May '11 at 22:29

1 Answers


Ivf md answer on 09 May '11 at 22:29

Either the sperm goes out the ends of the tube into the abdominal cavity OR the sperm fertilize the egg in the normal place within the tube and then the fertilized embryo gets expelled back out the tube. This is why we are careful not to do HSGs (tubal dye tests) during days after a woman has already ovulated.

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Cinderella 522 answer on 09 May '11 at 20:22

Almost immediately---well like i mean not right after your relations--LOL but, i mean right after the conception or joining of the sperm and egg. When they combine your body then releases the HGC, so therefore within a5-7 days it should be able to tell. If you are 2weeks late then it would def. have time to pick up the hormone if you are preg. Any other symptoms? I wish you well. Sometimes the HPT, does not pick up enough of the hormone, it is to little of an amount, did you try first morning urine so it would have to build up? Good luck love. Always avail to chat with. I would just have your OB write you a scrip to get the test. call them and they can give you all the details. HERE IS SOME OTHER INFO FOR YA!! There are two types of pregnancy tests. One tests the blood for the pregnancy hormone, hCG. The other checks the urine for this hormone. You can do a urine test at home with a home pregnancy test. You need to see a doctor to have blood tests. These days, most women first use home pregnancy tests (HPT) to find out if they are pregnant. HPTs are inexpensive, private, and easy to use. Urine tests will be able to tell if you're pregnant about 2 weeks after ovulation. Some more sensitive urine tests claim that they can tell if you are pregnant as early as one day after a missed period. If a HPT says you are pregnant, you should call your doctor right away. You doctor can use a more sensitive test along with a pelvic exam to tell for sure if you're pregnant. Seeing your doctor early on in your pregnancy will help you and your baby stay healthy. Doctors use two types of blood tests to check for pregnancy. Blood tests can pick up hCG earlier in a pregnancy than urine tests can. Blood tests can tell if you are pregnant about 6 to 8 days after you ovulate (or release an egg from an ovary). A quantitative blood test (or the beta hCG test) measures the exact amount of hCG in your blood. So it can find even tiny amounts of hCG. This makes it very accurate. Qualitative hCG blood tests just check to see if the pregnancy hormone is present or not. So it gives a yes or no answer. The qualitative hCG blood test is about as accurate as a urine test.

Icare answer on 09 May '11 at 22:02

This is tricky because usually a pregnancy test will give a positive reading just about 11 days after fertilisation of the ovum, but in your case, if you never get periods, you need to get checked out to see if you are actually ovulating at all. Birth control pills don't give you real periods ( i.e. based on a normal hormonal cycle of ovulation, and then shedding of a non-pregnant uterine lining). With birth control pills your body is conned into thinking it is pregnant so that you don't get pregnant! You then get a 'bleed' when you stop taking it. Natural hormones of all kinds are the 'messengers' used by your body to control all kinds of functions. The love hormones are the messengers that tell your ovaries and your uterus when to do what they are supposed to do. Birth control pills are artificial messengers which cause artificial symptoms. Women are sometimes prescribed birth control pills to reduce their menstrual flow if their periods are particularly troublesome, heavy and painful. If your own hormones are out of balance to the degree that you don't get periods at all, I think it is highly unlikely that you would be ovulating, and therefore the chances that you could become pregnant are virtually nil. Even girls with irregular periods sometimes have difficulty getting pregnant. Having said that, it only takes one egg and one sperm to make a baby! Please go back to whoever prescribes your birth control pills and tell them what is happening with your body. I'm surprised that you were prescribed birth control pills when you don't have periods. Don't leave these things to chance. It may be that you need altogether different treatment and that these pills are causing you symptoms you shouldn't be having. It sounds like your body is confused and needs some help. Artificial hormones are very powerful - they can make men grow breasts and women grow beards!

Jay-jay answer on 09 May '11 at 22:30

There isn?t more of a chance for pregnancy around ovulation, as it is the only chance to get pregnant when ovulating ? think about it, how can you get pregnant without an egg? The idea you can get pregnant any time is a half-truth scare tactic taught in schools, as many people aren't responsible enough to educate themselves they continue to believe this and don't understand menstrual cycles or conception. You ovulate one day per cycle around two weeks before your period, the egg lives a few days but about a week before ovulation you produce fertile cervical mucus that protects sperm allowing it to live for up to seven days. So a couple are fertile for around a week, birth control methods like fertility awareness give a few extra days as buffer so all together there are 8-10 days classed as fertile days. You only actually get pregnant when you ovulate, you are fertile for a few days beforehand, the rest of the time you can?t get pregnant, it?s biologically impossible.

Sevenofus answer on 10 May '11 at 13:54

An average pregnancy is considered to be 40 weeks counted from the first day of the last menstrual period. It is more common to count from the first day of the last menstrual period because date of conception is not easily determined. Even using an ovulation predictor kit or monitoring basal body temperature and cervical mucous, you can't know for sure when ovulation occurred. At best you will come up with a likely time frame to ovulate. In addition to the unknown factor of when the egg is released from the ovary, you also have the variable of how long sperm live inside a woman. Sperm do have potential to live inside a woman for several days, possibly as long as 6-7 days if conditions are optimal. After the egg has released from the ovary it remains viable for 12-24 hours, possibly as long as 48 hours. You can not, with all certainity, say that conception takes place the day you have love because of these factors. If you somehow know when conception took place, such as in the cases of fertility treatment procedures that fertilize the egg in a laboratory setting, than the average gestational period is considered to be 266 days or 38 weeks. When the fertilized egg implants in the uterus has no bearing on the length of the pregnancy. Even using 38 or 40 weeks is only an average. A good example to explain this is with the case of my cousin and his wife. They tried for 10 years to have a baby. When they had saved enough money they went through fertility treatments and discovered my cousin's sperm were damaged. They harvested her eggs and used donor sperm. They knew the exact moment of conception simply because it happened right there in the lab in front of the technicians. It took several tries, but finally one of the fertilized eggs implanted. They gave them a due date 266 days after the egg had been fertilized in the lab. In theory you would think that baby would have been born exactly on the due date. She wasn't. Their beautiful baby girl was born 9 days before it. Everything is based on averages. There is no exact science when it comes to predicting exactly when a baby might arrive. In regards to implantation, it varies considerably, but on average, the length of time it takes for the fertilized egg to implant in the uterus is 7-10 days. This, again, is nearly impossible to determine when it actually occurs.

Icare answer on 10 May '11 at 14:23

This is tricky because usually a pregnancy test will give a positive reading just about 11 days after fertilisation of the ovum, but in your case, if you never get periods, you need to get checked out to see if you are actually ovulating at all. Birth control pills don't give you real periods ( i.e. based on a normal hormonal cycle of ovulation, and then shedding of a non-pregnant uterine lining). With birth control pills your body is conned into thinking it is pregnant so that you don't get pregnant! You then get a 'bleed' when you stop taking it. Natural hormones of all kinds are the 'messengers' used by your body to control all kinds of functions. The love hormones are the messengers that tell your ovaries and your uterus when to do what they are supposed to do. Birth control pills are artificial messengers which cause artificial symptoms. Women are sometimes prescribed birth control pills to reduce their menstrual flow if their periods are particularly troublesome, heavy and painful. If your own hormones are out of balance to the degree that you don't get periods at all, I think it is highly unlikely that you would be ovulating, and therefore the chances that you could become pregnant are virtually nil. Even girls with irregular periods sometimes have difficulty getting pregnant. Having said that, it only takes one egg and one sperm to make a baby! Please go back to whoever prescribes your birth control pills and tell them what is happening with your body. I'm surprised that you were prescribed birth control pills when you don't have periods. Don't leave these things to chance. It may be that you need altogether different treatment and that these pills are causing you symptoms you shouldn't be having. It sounds like your body is confused and needs some help. Artificial hormones are very powerful - they can make men grow breasts and women grow beards!